Banner image for playmeo blog, featuring person holding pencil writing on paper

Blog

Leadership Tips

What is FUNN?

When opening a program I often make a simple invitation to my group to ‘play’ and to have FUNN. However, it’s fair to say that what they actually hear me say is to have “FUN,” but I deliberately add the extra N.

So, what is FUNN?

Karl Rohnke, co-founder of Project Adventure Inc, and best-selling author of Silver Bullets coined the term ‘FUNN’ to mean ‘Functional Understanding Not Necessary.’ 

It means that it’s okay to have fun, and you don’t have to understand what’s going on to have a fun time. Indeed, I often suggest to my groups that if they find themselves in the middle of an outrageous time, and were to stop and ask themselves ‘Why are we doing this?’ then don’t look too hard for an answer.

Fun is contagious and very difficult to stand away from. Also, within the realm of Challenge by Choice, it’s also hard to look cool sitting out from an activity when everyone else is having a great time.

I think the true essence of FUNN’s enormous transformative power is found within the old Chinese proverb that tells us: You can learn more about a person in an hour of play and than a day of a conversation. Too true.

I’ve seen the most hardened, cold, sceptical groups turn into the jolliest of people because they were having fun. And ‘having fun’ doesn’t mean they have to be rolling in the aisles embracing a giant belly laugh – having fun is about experiencing all that it is to be a human-being, particularly when this occurs within a non-threatening atmosphere.

So, two questions for you to ponder:

1. How much fun have you enjoyed today?

2. What type of fun did you introduce into your program today?

And, hey, if your answer to both questions is ‘none,’ then that’s OK. There’s nothing inherently wrong with not integrating fun into your program – but it may just explain why you’re meeting resistance.

To learn more about FUNN, click here to view a short video from our Facilitator Tips video series in which I explain this powerful concept further.

What do you think? Please share…

Contributor

There are currently no comments